Soil Water - Soil solution Not pure water Water strider...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–28. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Soil solution - Not pure water
Background image of page 2
Water strider
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hydrological cycle • water in living things
Background image of page 4
Importance to plants • Maintain turgidity • Carry dissolved nutrients • Required for Ps • Lost in transpiration to cool plant – and keep nutrients moving up
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Importance to plants • Partly responsible for soil temperature • Determines amount of soil air • Affects soil organisms, good and bad, that affect plants
Background image of page 6
Importance to plants • Erodes soil and crusts it • Leaches nutrients and excess SS • Affects tilth
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
WATER ON THE EARTH • been about the same amount for approx. 1 billion years Juvenile Water – Water brought to the surface or added to underground supplies from magma Meteoric water – The precipitation of condensed water from clouds as rain, snow, sleet, or hail.
Background image of page 8
WATER (HYDROLOGICAL) CYCLE
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relative percentages • oceans • glaciers • groundwater + lakes + streams + rivers + atmosphere
Background image of page 10
Hydrological cycle • powered by solar radiation
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hydrological cycle • precipitation over continents and oceans
Background image of page 12
Hydrological cycle • evaporation and transpiration - evapotranspiration
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hydrological cycle • runoff • infiltration - depends on soil/ rock type, amount of precipitation and rate of precipitation
Background image of page 14
Hydrological cycle • water balance
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Polarity and Hydrogen Bonding Negative attracts positive
Background image of page 16
Hydrogen Bonding
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Water will make hydrogen bonds with other surfaces such as glass, soil, plant tissues, and cotton. AND itself Water is a unique molecule
Background image of page 18
Water tends to stick to itself
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
Water strider
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Surface tension measures the strength of water molecules attracting to one another. This property allows insects to walk on the surface of water and the creation of waves. Surface Tension
Background image of page 22
High Specifc Heat Water resists temperature change , both For heating and cooling. •Water can absorb or release large amounts of heat energy •with little change in actual temperature.
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
High Heat of Vaporization In order for water to evaporate, hydrogen bonds must be broken. As water evaporates, it removes a lot of heat with it. Thus, the heat of vaporization refers to the amount of energy required to convert water from a liquid to a gas.
Background image of page 24
High Heat of Vaporization Water is a liquid at room temperature Should be a gas….
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Water is Less Dense as a Solid Which is ice and which is water?
Background image of page 26
•Most solids are more dense than their liquid •This makes solids sink •Ice is less dense than liquid water •Due to H-Bonds •Important to bodies of
Background image of page 27

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 28
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course GEOL 306 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at George Mason.

Page1 / 85

Soil Water - Soil solution Not pure water Water strider...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 28. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online