139sp10exam2review

139sp10exam2review - Math 13900 Exam 2 Review Spring 2010...

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Math 13900 Exam 2 Review Spring 2010 1 Note: This is NOT a practice exam. It is a collection of problems to help you review some of the material for the exam and to practice some kinds of problems. This collection is not necessarily exhaustive; you should expect some problems on the exam to look different from these problems. Section 9.3 Textbook p 643 # 10, 11 1. Give the most precise name you can for this polyhedron. 2. Give the most precise name you can for this polyhedron. 3. Determine for each of the following the smallest number of faces possible: a. Prism b. Pyramid c. Polyhedron 4. A certain polyhedron has 10 vertices and 18 edges. Could it be a prism? Explain. Could it be a pyramid? Explain. 5. Can a prism have exactly 33 edges? Explain how you know. Can a pyramid have exactly 33 edges? Explain how you know. 6. A certain polyhedron has 9 faces and 10 vertices. Could it be a prism? Explain. Could it be a pyramid? Explain.
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Math 13900 Exam 2 Review Spring 2010 2 7. Name by type (e.g., triangular prism) what kind of polyhedron would have the features described in each case. It is not possible to have the polyhedron described, explain why. a. A prism with 101 edges b. A prism with 101 vertices. c. A prism with 101 faces. d. A pyramid with 10 edges. e. A pyramid with 101 faces. f. A pyramid with 101 edges. ANSWERS Section 9.3 Answers to Chapter Test questions are in the back of the text. 1. A square pyramid. (A right square pyramid is an OK answer.) 2. A pentagonal prism. (A right pentagonal prism is an OK answer.) 3 a. A triangular prism has 5 faces. b. A triangular pyramid has 4 faces. c. Any polyhedron must have at least 4 faces. 4. A nonagonal pyramid. To be a prism with 10 vertices, you must have a pentagonal prism, with 5 vertices at each base. But this prism would have 15 edges: 5 at each base and 5 between the bases. To be a pyramid with 10 vertices, you must have a nonagonal pyramid, with 9 vertices around the base, and the tenth at the apex. This pyramid would indeed have 18 edges— 9 around the base and nine more going up to the apex. 5.
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139sp10exam2review - Math 13900 Exam 2 Review Spring 2010...

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