Risk of Residential Radon

Risk of Residential Radon -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Is Residential Radon a Significant Health Risk? Jared Meharg Health Physics Dr. Dingfelder November 14, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Is Residential Radon a Significant Health Risk? Risk management is the process of identifying potential hazards, and minimizing  the occurrence of those hazards by various methods.  By this definition, every human  (knowingly or not) practices risk management on a daily basis.  The simple act of  buckling a safety belt in a vehicle is an example of minimizing risk.  An essential  component of effective risk management is having the requisite knowledge needed to  lower associated risks to reasonable levels.  A key topic with regard to public safety is  that of residential radon exposure, and the various risk levels associated with exposure  to it.  Radon and its short lived daughters is the largest contributor to the natural  background radiation exposure to humans. Furthermore, radiation exposure has been  linked to an increase in cancer incidence.  Given these important facts, extensive  research has been conducted by the National Research Council’s committee on the  Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), as well as the Environmental Protection  Agency (EPA) and other international bodies.  From the research conducted, it can be  concluded that residential radon exposure can pose a significant health risk if not  managed properly.  Origins of Radon and its Effects As described by James E. Turner (2007) in the text  Atoms, Radiation, and  Radiation Protection , all elements heavier than lead (with exception to 209-Bi) are 
Background image of page 2
subject to natural radioactive decay.  These heavy elements decay by emitting either an  alpha or beta particle, in order to achieve a more stable energetic state.  Several  successive decays occur until a stable nuclide is present.  There are four natural decay  series, named after the heaviest precursor for each decay chain. 1  Radon is a noble gas  produced in all of the decay series, but the specific radon isotope of radiological concern  is 222-Rn.  The alternate isotopes of radon have relatively short half-lives, and pose  minimal biological concerns.  222-Rn, found in the uranium series, is a daughter of 226- Ra, and can be shown with the following alpha decay formula: 226 Ra     222 Rn  +   4 He 222-Rn has a half-life of 3.8 days, which allows for the noble gas to separate from the  surrounding material, and leak into the atmosphere (p. 96).       By itself, airborne radon does not pose much of a health risk, because it is not  completely absorbed into the body when inhaled.  Its radioactive daughters, however, 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

Risk of Residential Radon -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online