Matlab Section of Question 3.41

Matlab Section of Question 3.41 - For the upper boundary I...

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Matlab Section of Question 3.41 For the lower boundary I chose the number zero to indicate that the number was still negative, and then I choose a number smaller than zero to prove that the roots are positive. This helped me show that the poles are in the RHP when a number is below zero. Then I graphed it with Matlab to reiterate this fact. The graph is shown below. >> num=[1 5 10 10 5 0]; >> roots(num) ans = 0 -1.8090 + 0.5878i -1.8090 - 0.5878i -0.6910 + 0.9511i -0.6910 - 0.9511i >> num=[1 5 10 10 5 -1]; >> roots(num) ans = -1.9293 + 0.6752i -1.9293 - 0.6752i -0.6450 + 1.0925i -0.6450 - 1.0925i 0.1487
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Unformatted text preview: For the upper boundary I chose the number 3.88 to indicate that the number was still negative, and then I choose a number larger than 3.88 to prove that the roots are positive. This helped me show that the poles are in the RHP when a number is above 3.88. Then I graphed it with Matlab to reiterate this fact. The graph is shown below. >> num=[1 5 10 10 5 3.88]; >> roots(num) ans =-2.2356 -1.3818 + 1.1751i-1.3818 - 1.1751i-0.0004 + 0.7263i-0.0004 - 0.7263i >> num=[1 5 10 10 5 4]; >> roots(num) ans =-2.2457 -1.3850 + 1.1848i-1.3850 - 1.1848i 0.0078 + 0.7322i 0.0078 - 0.7322i...
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Matlab Section of Question 3.41 - For the upper boundary I...

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