1-homeostasis_and_thermoregulation_handout

1-homeostasis_and_thermoregulation_handout - Human...

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1 1 Human Physiology, Bio 12 Readings: Chapters 1, 3, 73; review chapter 2 Homeostasis and Thermoregulation 2 Lecture outline Homeostasis I. Introduction II.Physiology vs. pathophysiology III.Homeostasis A. Terms of homeostasis B. Types of correction mechanisms C. Levels of regulation i. Cells ii. Tissues iii. Organs iv. Organ systems D. The price of homeostasis 3 I. Body temperature throughout the day II. Ways we lose heat III. Reflex arc of temperature regulation- a negative feedback mechanism IV. Consequences of extreme core temperatures A. Hyperthermia B. Heat stroke C. Hypothermia V. Exercise-induced hyperthermia VI. Hyperthermia from fever A. Pyretics B. Anti-pyretics - COX inhibitors Lecture outline Thermoregulation
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2 4 Physiology: The science that is concerned with the function of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical processes involved. The study of disordered body function (i.e. disease) The basis for clinical medicine Pathophysiology: 5 A Recurrent Theme: Homeostasis The maintenance of a stable “milieu interieur” Claude Bernard (1813 - 1878) Prevent denaturation of proteins To keep cells under optimum conditions for function and survival It’s all about the plasma! Why do we need a stable internal environment? 6 Key Terms Variable - anything that changes and can be measured (ex. temp, pH, BP, [Na + ], [plasma glucose]) Set-point - a value that is optimal Deviation - a change from set point Correction - compensation; the amount of deviation depends on how great the deviation is!
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3 7 Negative feedback promotes stability 1. When a variable deviates from set-point, a sensor detects the deviation. 2. The input signal is compared to the set-point, forming a “difference signal” ( deviation ). 3. A preprogrammed correction is triggered (That’s the physiology: understanding how a system corrects itself) 4. The output signal activates an effector mechanism . In
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1-homeostasis_and_thermoregulation_handout - Human...

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