Livelihood Security and Adherence to ART

Livelihood Security and Adherence to ART - Livelihood...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Livelihood Security and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Low and Middle Income Settings: A Systematic Review Beth S. Rachlis 1 * , Edward J. Mills 2 , Donald C. Cole 1 1 Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada Abstract Introduction: We sought to examine the association between livelihood security and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ARVs) in low- and middle-income countries (LIMC). Methods: Performing a systematic review, we searched, independently and in duplicate, 7 electronic databases and 2 conference websites for quantitative surveys that examined the association between indicators of livelihood security and adherence to ARVs in LIMC between 2000–2010. Criteria for relevance were applied to complete papers (quantitative study with estimates of associations) and quality assessment was conducted on those deemed relevant. We performed three regressions to measure the association between each type of livelihood and adherence. Results: Twenty original studies and 6 conference abstracts were included, the majority from Africa (n = 16). Seventeen studies and 3 conference abstracts were cross-sectional and 3 studies and 3 abstracts were prospective clinical cohort studies, with considerable variation in quality for studies of each design type. Among the diverse populations represented, we observed considerable variation in associations between measurements of livelihood indicators and increasingly accepted adherence measures, irrespective of study design or quality. A financial capital indicator, financial constraints/ payment for ARV medication, was more commonly associated with non-adherence (3/5 studies). A human capital indicator, educational level, was most commonly associated with adherence (11/20 studies). Discussion: Additional better quality research examining livelihood security is required to inform provision of optimal supports for adherence and mitigation of the impacts of HIV/AIDS. Citation: Rachlis BS, Mills EJ, Cole DC (2011) Livelihood Security and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Low and Middle Income Settings: A Systematic Review. PLoS ONE 6(5): e18948. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0018948 Editor: Gary Maartens, University of Cape Town, South Africa Received November 30, 2010; Accepted March 18, 2011; Published May 12, 2011 Copyright: ß 2011 Rachlis et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: The authors have no support or funding to report....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/21/2012 for the course HUMBIO 156 taught by Professor Katzenstein,d during the Fall '11 term at Stanford.

Page1 / 15

Livelihood Security and Adherence to ART - Livelihood...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online