appa - A Appendix UNIX BSD In Chapter 21, we presented an...

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Unformatted text preview: A Appendix UNIX BSD In Chapter 21, we presented an in-depth examination of the Linux operating system. In this chapter, we examine another popular UNIX versionUnixBSD. We start by presenting a brief history of the UNIX operating system. We then present the systems user and programmer interfaces. Finally, we discuss the internal data structures and algorithms used by the FreeBSD kernel to support the userprogrammer interface. A.1 UNIX History The first version of UNIX was developed in 1969 by Ken Thompson of the Research Group at Bell Laboratories to use an otherwise idle PDP-7. Thompson was soon joined by Dennis Ritchie and they, with other members of the Research Group, produced the early versions of UNIX. Ritchie had previously worked on the MULTICS project, and MULTICS had a strong influence on the newer operating system. Even the name UNIX is a pun on MULTICS . The basic organization of the file system, the idea of the command interpreter (or the shell) as a user process, the use of a separate process for each command, the original line-editing characters (# to erase the last character and @ to erase the entire line), and numerous other features came directly from MULTICS. Ideas from other operating systems, such as MITs CTSS and the XDS-940 system, were also used. Ritchie and Thompson worked quietly on UNIX for many years. They moved it to a PDP-11/20 for a second version; for a third version, they rewrote most of the operating system in the systems-programming language C, instead of the previously used assembly language. C was developed at Bell Laboratories to support UNIX. UNIX was also moved to larger PDP-11 models, such as the 11/45 and 11/70. Multiprogramming and other enhancements were added when it was rewritten in C and moved to systems (such as the 11/45) that had hardware support for multiprogramming. As UNIX developed, it became widely used within Bell Laboratories and gradually spread to a few universities. The first version widely available outside Bell Laboratories was Version 6, released in 1976. (The version number for early UNIX systems corresponds to the edition number of the UNIX 831 832 Appendix A UNIX BSD Programmers Manual that was current when the distribution was made; the code and the manual were revised independently.) In 1978, Version 7 was distributed. This UNIX system ran on the PDP-11/70 and the Interdata 8/32 and is the ancestor of most modern UNIX systems. In particular, it was soon ported to other PDP-11 models and to the VAX computer line. The version available on the VAX was known as 32V. Research has continued since then. A.1.1 UNIX Support Group After the distribution of Version 7 in 1978, the UNIX Support Group (USG) assumed administrative control and responsibility from the Research Group for distributions of UNIX within AT&T, the parent organization for Bell Labora- tories. UNIX was becoming a product, rather than simply a research tool. The Research Group continued to develop their own versions of UNIX, however, to...
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appa - A Appendix UNIX BSD In Chapter 21, we presented an...

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