3 - CEREBRALVASCULAR DISEASE Dr LU QINCHI DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY REN JI HOSPITAL SHANGHAI JIAO TONG UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Tel

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CEREBRALVASCULAR DISEASE Dr. LU, QINCHI DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY REN JI HOSPITAL SHANGHAI JIAO TONG UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Tel: 58752345-3094 Email: [email protected]
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Cerebral vascular Disease Definition of term: The term cerebrovascular disease designates any abnormality of the brain resulting from a pathologic process of the blood vessels. Sudden loss of neurological function is the hallmark of cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death and the most common disabling neurologic disorder in western civilized countries where an increasing proportion of people survive to old age. Shanghai is entering the aging society Its incidence increases with age and is somewhat higher in men than in women.
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Risk factors for stroke Systolic or diastolic hypertension Diabetics Hypercholesterolemia Heart disease (afib) Cigarette smoking Heavy alcohol consumption High homocystine Oral contraceptive use
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The major types of cerebrovascular disease Cerebral ischaemia and infarction Transient Ischemic Attacks Atherosclerotic thrombosis Lacunes Embolism Hemorrhage Hypertensive hemorrhage Ruptured aneurysms and vascular malformations Other
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I 、 Cerebral ischaemia and infarction Anatomy and pathology The principal pathological process under consideration here is the occlusion of arteries supplying the brain. The two internal carotid arteries and the basilar artery form the Circle of Willis at the base of the brain, which acts as an efficient anatomotic device in the event of occlusion of arteries proximal to it.
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Anatomy and pathology Occlusion leads to sudden severe ischaemia in the area of brain tissue supplied by the occluded artery, and recovery depends upon rapid lysis or fragmentation of the occluding material: Reversal of neurological function within minutes or hours gives rise to the clinical picture of a transient ischaemic attack.
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Anatomy and pathology When the neurological deficit lasts longer than 24 hours, it may be called a reversible ischaemic neurological deficit ( RIND ) if it recovers completely in a few days, or a completed stroke if there is a persistent deficit. Sometimes recovery is very slow and incomplete.
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Neurological symptoms and signs The loss of function that the patient notices, and which may be apparent on examination, entirely depends on the area of brain tissue involved in the ischaemic process.
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Neurological symptoms and signs The following suggest middle cerebral territory: Dysphasia; Dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia; Loss of use of contralateral face and arm; Loss of feeling in contralateral face and arm.
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signs The following suggests anterior cerebral territory: Loss of use and/ or feeling in the contralateral leg. The following suggests posterior cerebral
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This note was uploaded on 01/21/2012 for the course PDBIO 305 taught by Professor Woods,a during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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3 - CEREBRALVASCULAR DISEASE Dr LU QINCHI DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY REN JI HOSPITAL SHANGHAI JIAO TONG UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Tel

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