LS1_Lecture_3_

LS1_Lecture_3_ - Dr. Allison Alvarado, [email protected]..

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Dr. Allison Alvarado, [email protected] Office hours: Fridays 9:30-11:30 am SH 2847
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± Textbook Update ± Mastering Biology ± Deadline Extension ± CCLE site ± Demo Material & Quiz
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The Evolution of Evolutionary Thought ± A scientific revolution overturns an existing idea about how nature works and replaces it with another, radically different, idea. ± Evolution by natural selection has become one of the best-supported and most important theories in the history of scientific research. ± People often use the word revolutionary to describe the theory of evolution by natural selection.
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± Plato claimed that every organism was an example of a perfect essence or type created by God and that these types were unchanging . ± Aristotle ordered the types of organisms into a linear scheme called the great chain of being . ± Central claims: 1. Species are fixed types. 2. Some species are higher - in the sense of being more complex or better - than others.
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Evolution by Natural Selection 1. It overturned the idea that species are static and unchanging . 2. It replaced typological thinking with population thinking. 3. It was scientific. It proposed a mechanism that could account for change through time and made predictions that could be tested through observation and experimentation. ± Change in species through time does not follow a linear, progressive pattern but instead is based on variation among individuals in populations. ± The theory of evolution by natural selection was revolutionary for several reasons:
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Darwin s Theory in a Nutshell ± Observation 1: All populations have the ability to grow exponentially ± Observation 2: A population cannot grow exponentially ± Observation 3: Variation exists within a population ± Observation 4: This variation must be heritable These lead to the deduction that there must be a struggle for existence Only a fraction of offspring produced will survive
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Observations 1 & 2 Exponential Logistic What types of things may control K?
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Darwin s Theory in a Nutshell ± Observation 1: All populations have the ability to grow exponentially ± Observation 2: A population cannot grow exponentially ± Observation 3: Variation exists within a population
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This note was uploaded on 01/22/2012 for the course LS 1 taught by Professor Thomas during the Spring '05 term at UCLA.

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LS1_Lecture_3_ - Dr. Allison Alvarado, [email protected]..

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