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LABPresentation - Sumatran tiger will be next....

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Biodiversity and Conservation Biology Project By: Ashley Brady Sarah Danehower
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Introduction Sumatran Tiger: Panthera tigris sumatrae Smallest of subspecies of tiger (males 8 ft. females 7 ft.) allows to move easier and quicker through the forest Habitat: Forests of the Indonesian Island of Sumatra Classified: Critically endangered Population > 500 Prey on large animals such as Wild Boar, Deer,
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Assessment of Risks - Deforestation - Poaching
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Deforestation Why? Palm Oil Palm oil is obtained from the African oil palm tree, Elaeis guineensi. Indonesia is the largest producer of palm oil (over 20 million tons) and beginning to use palm oil as a bio-fuel. Indonesia has the highest rate of tropical rain forest loss in the world. Indonesia has second largest area of deforestation, clearing 1.87 million hectares per
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Poaching 8 tiger subspecies, 3 have gone extinct in the last 70 years, with current trends the
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Unformatted text preview: Sumatran tiger will be next. Approximately 50 tigers hunted per year Hunters sell tigers bones, teeth, and skin Asian traditional medicine is in high demand for tiger body parts O'Brien, T. G., Kinnaird, M. F. and Wibisono, H. T. (2003), Crouching tigers, hidden prey: Sumatran tiger and prey populations in a tropical forest landscape. Animal Conservation, 6: 131139. doi: 10.1017/S1367943003003172 Matthew Linkie, Deborah J. Martyr, Jeremy Holden, Achmad Yanuar, Alip T. Hartana, Jito Sugardjito and Nigel Leader-Williams (2003). Habitat destruction and poaching threaten the Sumatran tiger in Kerinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra. Oryx, 37 , pp 41-48 doi:10.1017/S0030605303000103 Alexander, Caroline . "A Cry for the Tiger." National Geographic . Dec 2011: Print. http://www.palmoilaction.org.au/environmental-impacts-of-deforestation.html...
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LABPresentation - Sumatran tiger will be next....

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