BIO 462 Spring 2011 - Zelnio - Deep‐Sea
Biology
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Unformatted text preview: Deep‐Sea
Biology
 Bio
462
 Kevin
A.
Zelnio
 Spring
2011
 Contact
Information
 Kevin
A.
Zelnio
 Email:
[email protected]
 Office
Hours:
Hours
TBA
in
the
library,
or
by
appointment.
 I
will
respond
to
email
as
soon
as
possible,
but
please
allow
24
hours
for
a
response.

 
 Course
Description
 Welcome
to
the
Spring
2011
Deep‐Sea
Biology
course
at
UNCW!
This
semester
we
will
take
an
 integrative
approach
towards
understanding
the
Deep
Sea.
It
is
my
hope
that
you
not
only
come
 out
this
course
with
an
appreciation
for
the
history,
biology,
adaptations
and
unique
habitats
 that
make
up
Earth’s
largest
environment,
but
to
appreciate
this
as
case‐study
in
how
we
can
 understand
a
system
using
a
multidisciplinary
approach.
While
we
will
focus
on
biological
 aspects
of
the
Deep
Sea,
we
cannot
understand
without
more
than
a
passing
familiarity
with
 geology,
chemistry,
physics,
history
and
sociology.
 
 The
course
is
divided
into
4
sections:
Exploration
and
Processes,
Biology
in
the
Deep
Sea,
Deep
 Sea
Habitats,
Humans
and
the
Deep
Sea.
Each
section
will
guide
you
through
understanding
 Deep‐Sea
Biology
as
a
case
study
for
an
integrative
approach
to
learning.
Finally,
we
will
end
the
 course
exploring
the
how
humans
have
affected
one
of
the
environments
furthest
from
our
 reach
 
 About
your
instructor:
I
have
worked
in
the
deep‐sea
environment
for
8
years,
gone
on
several
 large
oceanographic
expeditions
and
dove
as
deep
as
2500
meters
in
submersibles.
My
previous
 research
concerned
studying
the
biodiversity,
community
ecology
and
population
genetics
of
 deep‐sea
chemosynthetic‐based
environments
such
as
hydrothermal
vents
and
methane
seeps.
 Additionally,
I
have
described
5
species
of
shrimp
and
anemones
from
these
unique
underwater
 volcanoes.
Furthermore,
I
am
very
active
in
the
online
science
community
and
am
a
freelance
 writer
and
scientist,
and
Assistant
Editor
at
Deep
Sea
News.
At
UNCW
I
am
studying
natural
 hybridizing
populations
and
population
genetics
of
marine
animals
(and
pitcher
plants!).
 
 Course
Time
and
Location
 Class
Meetings:
Monday,
Wednesday,
and
Friday
12:00
to
12:50
pm
Dobo
Hall
103
 
 Course
Website:
http://www.zelnio.org/teaching/
 
 Texts
and
Readings
 You
should
get
Tony
Koslow’s
The
Silent
Deep.
I
did
not
order
the
book
through
the
UNCW
 Bookstore
because
it
is
nearly
half
the
price
on
Amazon
and
other
online
retailers.
The
last
I
saw
 on
Amazon
(http://www.amazon.com/Silent‐Deep‐Discovery‐Ecology‐ Conservation/dp/0226451259)
used
copies
were
as
low
as
$10
and
new
copies
were
around
$20
 for
the
paperback
and
$25
for
the
hard
cover.
If
you
are
on
a
scholarship
that
requires
you
to
 purchase
books
only
via
the
campus
bookstore,
let
me
know
and
I’ll
try
to
make
arrangements.
I
 will
also
have
a
copy
on
reserve
at
the
Library.
I
think
you
will
enjoy
Koslow’s
book,
it
is
a
good
 overview
for
the
topics
we
will
explore
in
greater
detail
in
the
lectures
and
is
a
nicely
illustrated
 read.
 
 There
will
be
many
additional
reading
from
the
primary
literature
and
popular
science
articles.
I
 will
make
them
availablefor
download
as
pdf
files
(Adobe
Reader
is
a
freely
available
pdf
reader
 http://get.adobe.com/reader).
 
 Course
Goals
 During
your
time
in
Bio
462
I
would
like
to
expose
you
to
life
in
the
deep
sea.
I
hope
you
walk
 away
from
the
class
with
an
appreciation
of
how
surface
and
benthic
processes
are
linked,
how
 life
adapts
to
unique
physical
environments,
how
studying
the
ocean
requires
a
multidisciplinary
 toolkit,
and
how
our
actions
as
human
on
this
planet
affect
an
environment
very
alien
and
very
 distant
to
ours.
Most
will
not
be
marine
biologists,
but
I
will
have
done
my
job
as
an
educator
if
 you
have
gained
a
lifelong
passion
or
appreciation
of
the
ocean,
its
denizens,
and
how
are
a
part
 of
it
all.
 
 Course
Assessment
 There
are
three
midterms
that
are
multiple
choices
at
the
end
of
the
first
three
sections.
Each
 midterm
exam
is
25%
of
your
grade.
The
final
exam
will
be
an
in
class
short
essay
format,
and
be
 worth
25%
of
your
grade.
 
 Midterm
1
–
February
11
....................
25%
 Midterm
2
–
March
11
........................
25%
 Midterm
3
–
April
20
...........................
25%
 Final
Exam
–
May
6
11:30‐2:30pm
......
25%
 


































































 ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
 
 
 
 
 








100%
 There
are
absolutely
NO
MAKE
UP
exams
unless
you
have
an
official
note
from
a
doctor,
for
a
 funeral,
or
an
official
note
for
a
prescheduled
sporting
event.
In
which
case
YOU
MUST
schedule
 to
take
the
midterm
exam
ahead
of
time
with
me.
There
are
too
many
students
in
the
course
to
 make
individual
exceptions
and
I
will
only
official
UNCW
excuses
and
the
proper
official
notation
 for
the
absence.

 
 Academic
Integrity
 I
take
academic
integrity
VERY
seriously.
UNCW
has
an
ACADEMIC
HONOR
CODE
that
you
 should
all
make
sure
you
are
familiar
with
if
you
haven’t
already:
 http://uncw.edu/stuaff/odos/honorcode/.
For
instructors,
UNCW
makes
it
very
easy
to
report
 suspected
infringements
against
academic
integrity
(form
is
available
online
 http://appserv01.uncw.edu/SelectSurveyNET/TakeSurvey.aspx?SurveyID=n4K2753K).
Cheating
 on
an
exam
results
in
an
automatic
F
for
that
exam.
 Course
Schedule

 This
is
a
general
guideline.
For
the
most
up‐to‐date
schedule
see
the
class
website.
 
 
 
 SECTION
I:
History
and
Processes
 January
 12
 Introduction
to
Class/What
is
the
deep
sea
 
 14
 AWAY
AT
CONFERENCE
NO
CLASS
 
 17
 MLK
DAY
NO
CLASSES
 
 19
 History
of
Deep
Sea
Exploration
I:
Major
people
and
expeditions
 
 21
 History
of
Deep
Sea
Exploration
II:
Sampling
in
the
Deep
 
 24
 Geology
of
the
Deep‐Sea
Floor
 
 26
 Chemistry
of
the
Deep‐Sea
 
 28
 Hydrodynamics
of
the
Deep‐Sea
Floor
 
 31
 Carbon
Cycling
and
Benthic‐Pelagic
Coupling
 February
 2
 Midwater
and
Seafloor
Microbial
Ecology
 
 4
 Organisms
of
the
Deep‐Sea:
Open
Water
 
 7
 Organisms
of
the
Deep‐Sea:
The
Benthos
 
 9
 Catch
Up
and
Review
 
 11
 MIDTERM
1
 
 
 SECTION
II:
Biology
in
the
Deep
Sea
 
 14
 Physiological
and
Biochemical
Adaptations
 
 16
 Sex
and
Seasonality
in
the
Sea
 
 18
 Larval
Dispersal
 
 21
 Bioluminescence
and
Visual
Ecology
 
 23
 Nutrients
and
Food
Sources
 
 25
 Feeding
Ecology
and
Adaptations
 
 28
 Symbioses
 March
 2
 Animal
Sediment
Relationships
 
 4
 Body
Size
 
 7
 Patterns
in
Biomass
and
Abundance
 
 9
 Catch
Up
and
Review
 
 11
 MIDTERM
2
 
 14
 Spring
Break
NO
CLASSES
 
 16
 Spring
Break
NO
CLASSES
 
 18
 Spring
Break
NO
CLASSES
 
 
 SECTION
III:
Deep‐Sea
Habitats
 
 21
 Introduction
to
Deep‐Sea
Habitats
 
 23
 Shelf
and
Slope
 
 25
 Abyssal
Plains
 
 28
 Seamounts,
Trenches
and
other
Hard
Substrata
 
 30
 Coral
and
Sponge
Reefs
 
 April
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 May
 
 1
 4
 6
 8
 11
 13
 15
 18
 20
 22
 
 25
 27
 29
 2
 6
 Hydrothermal
Vents:
Ecology,
Biogeography
 Hydrothermal
Vents:
Adaptations
to
an
Extreme
Environment
 Methane
Seeps
and
Mud
Volcanoes
 Whale
and
Wood
Falls,
OMZs
 Patterns
in
Biodiversity
 Biogeography
and
Paleobiology
 Evolution
and
Origin
of
the
Deep
Sea
Fauna
 Catch
up
and
Review
 MIDTERM
3
 Good
Friday
NO
CLASSES
 SECTION
IV:
Humans
and
the
Deep
Sea
 Climate
Change
and
Pollution
 Economic
Interests
 Law
of
the
Sea
and
Our
future
in
the
Ocean

 Everyone
Is
a
Stakeholder,
Evaluations
and
Closing
Comments
 FINAL
EXAM
11:30‐2:30pm
 ...
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