Lecture 5--1_19--Ethics and Intuition Lecture ctools

Lecture 5--1_19--Ethics and Intuition Lecture ctools -...

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Ethics and Intuitions Lecture 4: Thurs, January  Lecture 4: Thurs, January  20th 20th 1
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Objections to NRC Objection 4: If NRC is True, Moral  Progress is Impossible Jim Crow in 1950:   O  morally right because  most people in the U.S. approve of it Racial Equality in 2010 :   morally right because  most people in the U.S. approve of it 2
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Objections to NRC Objection 5: If NCR is true, then genuine  moral disagreement is not possible. Genuine moral disagreement –a disagreement  in which one party is correct or at least better  justified than the other party. 3
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Is There Nothing to Say in Favor of  NRC? Recall some of the examples of culture  differences: Discussing Fanny-Packs in the UK vs. US Treatment of and memorializing of the dead Family structures Manners/etiquette Food and eating rules  Religious views Doesn’t it seem that some things really are  relative to culture? 4
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Kernel of Truth in NRC Suppose that there are universal moral  truths.   Suppose that “don’t disrespect your elders” is  one of them. Consider the Fanny-Pack case again Suppose that “honor the dead” is one of them Consider burying vs. eating the dead That is to say: cultural context matters 5
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Intuitions—What Are They? Example: Haidt’s Experiments Example: Regarding DCT 6
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Rawls: Reflective Equilibrium RE is an influential and popular (amongst  moral philosophers) view about  About what the relation between ethical theory  and everyday ethical intuitions should be Offers a method by which we should evaluate  normative ethical theories and abstract moral  principles. 7
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Rawls: Reflective Equilibrium, cont. How to evaluate normative ethical theories Possibility #1: look for an ethical theory or moral  principle that captures *all* of our everyday  intuitions Possibility #2: ignore our everyday intuitions for  the most part and look for a simple, elegant,  plausible ethical theory 8
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Possibility #3: (Reflective Equilibrium) Balance  intuitions and theory look for a theory that captures as many of our  everyday intuitions as possible but in some cases, we will find that an otherwise  very convincing theory leads to one or two results  we find unintuitive Sometimes we become convinced that original intuitions  are mistaken
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course PHIL 160 taught by Professor Amandaroth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture 5--1_19--Ethics and Intuition Lecture ctools -...

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