Lecture 10--Deontology_ Kantianism, cont. CTools

Lecture 10--Deontology_ Kantianism, cont. CTools -...

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Deontology:  Kantianism, cont. Lecture 10: Tues, February  Lecture 10: Tues, February  7th 7th
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Agenda Highlight Some Important Aspects of Kant’s  Moral Philosophy  Freedom and Rationality Why be Moral? Moral Worth Formula of Humanity Evaluate Kantianism Objections Kant on Lying Comparing & Contrasting C, PFD, & K on Cases
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Families of Moral  Theories Normative Theories Consequentialism Deontology Virtue Ethics Act Utilitarianism Rule Utilitarianism  Prima Facie Duties Kantianism 3
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Kant thinks we humans are free in a way  animals are not: animals can act on the basis of desire, instinct,  emotion, inclination  Heteronomous:  subject to laws (such as the laws of  biology or psychology) external to oneself only humans can use reason to determine our will Autonomous:  subject to a law internal to oneself – i.e. a  law one gives oneself Analogy to democratic government
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Worry: Why think humans really are free in this  way? (there are plenty of philosophical skeptics  about free will) Kant’s answer:  one cannot deliberate or act except  by assuming that s/he is free and determine what to  do by reason One also cannot think that one is subject to moral  constraints unless one assumes one has this sort of freedom This is “freedom in the practical sense”: it is not a claim that we  are  actually  free, but that we must assume we are when we think  about what to do
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So humans, are practically free and  autonomous when we deliberate, we determine what to  do based on reasons our wills are governed by a law we give to  ourselves What is this law that we give to ourselves? The CI!! Specifically the universal law version of the CI
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Why Should We Be Moral? Why should we be moral? (metaethical  question) Kant: Morality is rationally required Our wills, in virtue of our autonomy, rationality,  and practical freedom are governed by the law  we give ourselves The law we give ourselves is the CI—the supreme moral law
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Why Should We Be Moral?, cont.
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course PHIL 160 taught by Professor Amandaroth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture 10--Deontology_ Kantianism, cont. CTools -...

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