{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture 14--Virtue Ethics_The Situationist Objection ctools-1

Lecture 14--Virtue Ethics_The Situationist Objection ctools-1

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Virtue Ethics:  The Situationist  Objection Lecture 14:  Tues, February 22 nd
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
VT vs. C & D—Some Differences,  cont. Difference #4—Fragmentation of Morality Recall Scanlon says that contractualism is about  “what we owe to each other”—our moral  obligations/duties Generally focused on our obligations not to harm others  and to help others avoid harm; not about what makes for  a worthwhile life or how to value things like friends,  family, sex, beauty, knowledge, etc. largely true of all of the deontological theories and (to a  somewhat lesser extent) consequentialism too. VT, in contrast, doesn’t involve this kind of  fragmentation
Image of page 2
Potential Worries about  VT… …which we saw last time VT doesn’t tell us what to do Response:  yes, virtue theory’s primary goal is to tell  us what sort of person to be, not what to do.  But  secondarily it does also tell us something about how  to act e.g. each virtue gives an instruction—be courageous—and  each vice gives a prohibition—don’t be cruel What if the virtues (and instructions which  come from them) conflict? Response:  part of what it is to be virtuous is to have  a certain kind of know-how This know-how allows one to know which kind of  action/which virtue is called for in a particular situation
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Appeal of Virtue Theory Pro #1: VT on Why/How we Admire Others Sometimes we admire people for particular morally  good things they accomplished Got women the vote: suffragettes Lead civil rights movement: MLK Some people we admire not for what they  accomplished, but for the sort of person they were Courageous people Forgiving people People who stand by their convictions
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}