Lecture 18--Justice--Liberty or Equality Justice as Fairness ctools

Lecture 18--Justice--Liberty or Equality Justice as Fairness ctools

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Justice: Liberty or  Equality?— Justice as Fairness Lecture 18:  Thurs, March 17 th   1
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Against Redistribution Wilt Chamberlain Thought Experiment Start with a just distribution of money—say everyone  has $50,000.   Then suppose that no one does any transferring  except  that many people voluntarily decide to go see W.C.  play basketball and are willing to pay 25 cents to him  directly to do so.  At the end of the year, W.C. has $250,000 while  everyone else has just under $50,000. Nozick: How could this new distribution be unjust?  We started with a just distribution and all transfers were voluntary So, how could it be unjust that W.C. has so much more than others? 2
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Against Redistributions, cont. The point: liberty upsets attempts to  redistribute! Suppose you think a just society is one in which, say,  everyone has the same amount or people get paid in  proportion to how hard they work W.C. example shows that the only way to accomplish such a  distribution is to  continuously  interfere with people’s lives.   Must either prevent people from deciding to pay 25 cents to watch  W.C. play basketball Or must tax W.C.   Forced labor! 3
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Objection 1: To the Very Basis of  Libertarianism In order for philosophical libertarianism to get  going, we must accept: 1) That we own ourselves Why think this is true?  Are people the kind of thing that  can be  owned —even by oneself? 2) That the Lockean Proviso governs how we can  justly acquire property in the state of nature But how to make sense of the proviso in contemporary  terms given everything has already been acquired. 3) That property rights exist  prior  to the existence of  a government (Rawls disagrees) 4
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Objection 2: What about… poor people, disabled people, public schools,  etc?  If govt. doesn’t take care of them who  will? Nozick’s answer:  govt. programs involve  forcing  people to pay taxes                                                         = infringement of liberty But don’t worry—individual citizens can  voluntarily  create charities to take care of these issues 5
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Objection 3: Contingencies of Birth  (Rawls) Objection: It is unjust (  in the sense of being  UNFAIR ) to allow contingencies of birth to  determine the course of a person’s life e.g. Bob who is born poor 6
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Objection 4: False Conception of  Nozick focuses on negative liberty as the only  kind that matters But this is not the only kind of liberty  Negative liberty
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course PHIL 160 taught by Professor Amandaroth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture 18--Justice--Liberty or Equality Justice as Fairness ctools

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