Lecture 26--Questioning Morality_Against Moral Sainthood ctools

Lecture 26--Questioning Morality_Against Moral Sainthood ctools

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1 Questioning Morality —Against Moral  Sainthood Lecture 26—Thurs, 4/14
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Lecture Outline Finish Up Last Lecture Psychological Egoism A problem with the “more plausible” version of PE Nietzsche Master/slave moralities Wolf on Moral Saints Definition Obligation vs. Supererogation Loving vs. Rational Saints Why MS is Unattractive Two Objections 2
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A More Plausible Form of  PE? 2) understand PE in terms of  any  desire I have  (including other-regarding  desires e.g. I want sick people to be cured even if it happens  after I die and I never hear about it and so can  never be made happy by it. This doesn’t sound “selfish” at all! We can still distinguish good and bad actions, character, etc. 
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A Problem with the “More  Plausible” Form of PE It is not really a form of PE after all. PE insists that we only act for the sake of our own  self-interest (self-regarding desires only) We tried to revise PE to make it more plausible by  understanding “self-interest” to include both self-  and other-regarding desires but this “revision” to PE has moved us so far away for  the original version of PE that what we have is no longer  a form of PE Conclusion: we can’t make PE more plausible
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A Second Challenge to Morality  —Master/Slave Moralities Unlike Glaucon, Nietzsche is not arguing  that we should only be good if/when/  because it is in our self-interest to do so Rather, Nietzsche is arguing that there two very  different conceptions of “good” that stem from  two contrasting moralities 5
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Master/Slave Moralities Slave morality: Developed historically amongst people who were “raped,  the oppressed, the suffering, the shackled, the weary, the  insecure” (29) E.g. Judeo-Christian tradition Results Pessimistic suspicion about human condition Encourage pity, kindness, helpfulness, warm heart, patience,  diligence, friendliness (29) Utility! (30) Typified by contrast of “good vs. evil Evil =  Things/people that evoke fear Good =  the opposite of evil 6
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Master/Slave Moralities, cont. Master morality:
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course PHIL 160 taught by Professor Amandaroth during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture 26--Questioning Morality_Against Moral Sainthood ctools

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