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6 early jazz-upload - Trajectory of Jazz 5-1915 Origins as...

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e Trajectory of Jazz 95-1915: Origins as a Folk music, Social music 35–1945: America’s Favorite Popular Music (“Swing Era”) day: Traditional music, pop music, and art music
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rly Jazz Performer’s Music (rather than a composer’s music) Improvisation and Experimentation Rhythmic Sensation Hybrid musical origins • African-American roots • Grows in New Orleans (1890s-1900s) and spreads in the 1910s and 1920s
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Jelly Roll Morton (1890–1941) New Orleans Creole early jazz pianist, composer “Maple Leaf Rag” (1938)
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Jelly Roll Morton, “Maple Leaf Rag” (1938) In comparison to Joplin’s 1916 recording, Morton’s jazzed-up, improvisatory version: How does Morton alter Joplin’s version?
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Original Dixieland Jass Band quintet of white musicians from New Orleans • 1st group to record jazz (1917) • Nick LaRocca (leader/cornet) claims that jazz is “strictly white man’s music.”
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ODJB, “Tiger Rag” (1918) Sensational, syncopated. Continuous Group Polyphony • Cornet/trumpet (lead melody) • Clarinet (2nd melody) • Trombone (3rd melody)
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