Notes%20Ch%202

Notes%20Ch%202 - Chapter 2 2.1 Graphically Summarizing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2 2.1 Graphically Summarizing Qualitative Data Example Toyota will be producing a new hybrid model FT-CH, and the marketing department is conducting a marketing survey that will help to select the four most preferred colors for a compact car among young professionals. Below is a sample of 30 responses. # Color # Color # Color 1 Red 11 Silver 21 Yellow 2 Silver 12 Gray 22 Pink 3 Black 13 Beige 23 Green 4 White 14 Silver 24 Green 5 Black 15 Blue 25 Black 6 Silver 16 Gray 26 Silver 7 Green 17 Silver 27 Silver 8 Red 18 Silver 28 Red 9 Blue 19 Black 29 Green 10 Blue 20 Gray 30 Pink The previous data can be summarized in a frequency distribution table, a bar graph, and a pie chart. Frequency Distribution Frequency distribution is a tabular summary of data showing the number (frequency) of items in each of several non-overlapping classes. For the Toyota example, the frequency distribution table should look like this: Excel Step-by-step 1 Arrange the data in one column; make sure to have the header in the first row. 2 Click on Data/Advanced (Filter) 3 In the Advanced Filter dialog: select ‘copy to another location’, enter the range (including the header) and the target cell, check on ‘Unique records only’, and click OK
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 A list of unique records will be populated at the target cell. Next, enter the formula =COUNTIF(RANGE,CRITERIA) on cell E2 as shown below. The $ signs lock the cell position; press F4 to add $ signs. 5 Copy and paste this formula to populate the frequencies for each of the unique records. At the bottom of the table you can add a row to sum ( =SUM (RANGE) ) the frequencies to get the total frequency. This total must equal the total number of elements in your sample (30). Relative Frequency and Percent Relative Frequency Distributions A relative frequency equals the fraction or proportion of items belonging to a class. A relative frequency distribution gives a tabular summary of data showing the relative frequency for each class. A percent frequency distribution summarizes the percent frequency of the data for each class. Color Frequenc y Relative Frequency Percent Frequenc y Red 3 0.100 10% Silver 8 0.267 27% Black 4 0.133 13% White 1 0.033 3% Green 4 0.133 13% Blue 3 0.100 10% Gray 3 0.100 10% Beige 1 0.033 3% Yellow 1 0.033 3% Pink 2 0.067 7% Total 30 1.000 100% Excel Step-by-step 1 Create a column with a name ‘Relative Frequency’ 2 Enter the formula as shown below.
Background image of page 2
3 Copy and paste this formula to populate the relative frequencies of each of the unique records. The last row should be 1.000, as shown below.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course ECON 2300 taught by Professor Dodonova during the Spring '08 term at Kennesaw.

Page1 / 10

Notes%20Ch%202 - Chapter 2 2.1 Graphically Summarizing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online