ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES - ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS...

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ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES (THE WAY THEY ARE CAUSED)   Although not all diseases are infectious (caused by microorganisms), those that are due to  microbes are the topic of this section. The requirements for establishing a specific pathogen as  the causative agent of a particular disease are known as Koch Postulates:    1. The same pathogen must be present in every case of the disease.    2. The pathogen must be isolated from the diseased host and grown in pure culture.    3. The pathogen from the pure culture must cause the disease when it is inoculated into a  healthy, susceptible lab animal (or apple!).    4. The inoculated animal must develop the disease, and the original pathogen must be isolated  from it.      EXCEPTIONS TO KOCH’S POSTULATES   Characteristics of some microorganisms and some diseases make it impossible to exactly follow  Koch’s postulates:
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ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES - ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS...

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