FUNGI - Harmful effects include damage to crops and...

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FUNGI, ALGAE, PROTOZOA, AND MULTICELLULAR  PARASITES   FUNGI ALGAE PROTOZOA HELMINTHS KINGDOM FUNGI PROTISTA PROTISTA ANIMALIA NUTRITIONAL TYPE CHEMOHETERO- TROPH PHOTOAUTO-TROPH CHEMOHETERO-TROPH CHEMOHETERO-TROPH MULTICELLULARITY ALL, EXCEPT YEASTS SOME NONE ALL CELLULAR  ARRANGEMENT UNICELLULAR,  FILAMENTOUS,  FLESHY UNICELLULAR,  COLONIAL FILAMENTOUS, TISSUES UNICELLULAR TISSUES AND  ORGANS FOOD ACQUISITION  METHOD ABSORPTIVE ABSORPTIVE ABSORPTIVE,  INGESTIVE INGESTIVE,  ABSORPTIVE CHARACTERISTIC  FEATURES SEXUAL AND  ASEXUAL SPORES PIGMENTS MOTILITY; SOME FORM  CYSTS MANY HAVE  ELABORATE LIFE  CYCLES EMBRYO FORMATION NONE NONE NONE ALL     FUNGI The study of fungi is called mycology. Like all microbes, fungi are both beneficial and harmful  to humans. Of about 100,000 species only about 200 are pathogenic to humans and animals. 
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Unformatted text preview: Harmful effects include damage to crops and diseases of humans and domestic animals. Beneficial effects for humans include foods and production of alcohol and drugs. Fungi produce enzymes that allow them to decompose dead plant matter. Many plants have associated symbiotic fungi called mycorrhizae, which help their roots absorb nutrients. All fungi are chemoheterotrophs, obtaining energy and carbon from organic compounds. With the exception of a very few anaerobic fungi, most are aerobic or facultatively anaerobic. Among the microscopic fungi, yeasts are unicellular and molds are multicellular....
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course MCB MCB2010 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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