OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS

OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS - OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS

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OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS   Under certain circumstances, relationships between organisms can change. For example,  common strains of  Escherichia coli  are harmless or beneficial in the large intestine. However,  E.  coli  is a very common cause of urinary tract infections if it gains access to that area. It also can  cause infections in the lungs, spinal cord, or wounds. Opportunistic pathogens are organisms that  do not ordinarily cause disease in their natural habitat in a healthy person, but in case of broken  skin, damaged mucous membranes, or a weakened host, these same organisms can cause serious  disease. Most AIDS patients die of infections caused by opportunistic pathogens that take  advantage of the weakened immune system. One type of pneumonia, caused by  Pneumocystis  jiroveci,  is seldom seen except in AIDS patients, although we have all probably been exposed to 
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course MCB MCB2010 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS - OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS

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