PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF VIRUSES

PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF VIRUSES - destruction. 8) Some...

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PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF VIRUSES       4) Some viruses may cause adjacent cells to fuse together, forming a very large cell called a  syncitium. Paramyxoviruses are known for this.       5) Some viral infections result in changes in function but no visible changes in appearance.       6) Some virus-infected cells produce interferons. Infection by the virus causes this, but the  genes for the interferons are located in the host cell DNA, and the infection causes those genes to  be expressed. Interferons protect nearby uninfected cells from invasion by the virus.       7) Viral infections may cause changes in the antigens on the surface of infected cells. The  immune system of the host can then recognize that the cells are abnormal and target them for 
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Unformatted text preview: destruction. 8) Some viruses can cause changes in the chromosomes of the host cells. Chromosomes may be damaged or broken. Oncogenes (genes that may cause cancer) may be brought in by a virus, or oncogenes present in the cells DNA may be activated by the virus. 9) Most normal cells growing in tissue cultures stop growing when they are in contact with other cells on all sides. This is known as contact inhibition. Certain viruses can transform cells so that their appearance changes and they no longer recognize contact inhibition....
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