PLASMID1 - PLASMIDS, LYSOGENY, AND PATHOGENICITY

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PLASMIDS, LYSOGENY, AND PATHOGENICITY   Plasmids are small circular pieces of DNA that are not part of the main bacterial chromosome  and contain genes not found on the main chromosome. They are replicated and passed on to  daughter cells during cell division. One group of plasmids are known as R plasmids or R factors,  because their genes make bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Other plasmids may contribute to  bacterial pathogenicity, often by carrying genes for making toxins. Bacterial strains that lack the  plasmid may be harmless or only cause certain symptoms. With the plasmid, the bacteria cause  additional harm to the host.    Some bacteriophages can incorporate their DNA into the bacterial chromosome, becoming a  prophage. This state is called lysogeny, and cells containing the prophage are called lysogenic  cells. Genes carried on the phage DNA may give lysogenic cells new characteristics. This is 
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course MCB MCB2010 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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PLASMID1 - PLASMIDS, LYSOGENY, AND PATHOGENICITY

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