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RECOMBINANT DNA AND BIOTECHNOLOGY

RECOMBINANT DNA AND BIOTECHNOLOGY - as this makes it sound...

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RECOMBINANT DNA AND BIOTECHNOLOGY   Genetic engineering (recombinant DNA technology) was first carried out in 1973. The first  product produced this way, human insulin, was put on the market in 1982.    Recombination is the transfer of new genes into a cell by transformation, conjugation, or  transduction. At times this occurs naturally, but in genetic engineering selected genes can be  introduced with the purpose of giving a cell or organism the ability to synthesize specific new  proteins. Genes are most frequently inserted into one-celled organisms such as bacteria, since the  process is much simpler.    Biotechnology refers to the industrial application of genetic engineering.      GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF RECOMBINANT DNA   PROCEDURES   This is the procedure as it is most often done. Number one thing to remember: it is not as simple 
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Unformatted text preview: as this makes it sound! 1. The gene for the desired protein is obtained from a donor chromosome. 2. The donated gene is incorporated into a plasmid. 3. Plasmid-donor gene complex is carried into susceptible cell through the process of transformation. 4. Cells successfully receiving the plasmid-donor gene complex are isolated, identified, and cultured. These cells will have the ability to produce whatever protein the gene normally codes for. These cells can be grown in culture to form a clone, which contains identical cells all having the new gene. 5. Protein product is recovered and purified....
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