SCIENTIFIC NOMENCLATURE

SCIENTIFIC NOMENCLATURE - SCIENTIFICNOMENCLATURE

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SCIENTIFIC NOMENCLATURE Common names for organisms are not always the same in every country, or even in different  parts of the same country. Each organism needs to be assigned a name that is recognized by all  biologists. Scientific nomenclature began with Linnaeus, who chose Latin, which was the  language of scholars in his day. The name of each organism has 2 parts (binomial nomenclature).  These names are the same world-wide. Rules for naming protozoa and parasitic worms are in the  International Code of  Zoological  Nomenclature.  Rules for naming fungi and algae are in the  International Code of  Botanical  Nomenclature.  Rules for naming newly classified bacteria are established by the  International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology and published in the  International  Journal of Systematic Bacteriology.  They are then included in the standard of  reference for 
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course MCB MCB2010 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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