SYSTEMS OF CLASSIFICATION

SYSTEMS OF CLASSIFICATION - separate nucleus. Although it...

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SYSTEMS OF CLASSIFICATION From the beginning of scientific study, organisms have been sorted and classified.  1. Ancient Greeks on to 1700’s---2 kingdoms, plant and animal, not many groups besides this 2. 1735---Linnaeus also used 2 kingdom system, but established other groups (taxa) and  classified most known organisms into all his groups. Microorganisms didn’t get a clear place in  this system, but they were fairly new and not well known anyway. 3. In 1866, Haeckel proposed adding the kingdom Protista for all microorganisms. 4. Beginning in late 1930’s---the next step was the development of the electron microscope,  which allowed detailed study of the tiny structures within cells for the first time. It was then  realized that there were 2 basic types of cells---the eukaryotic cells with a distinct, membrane- bound nucleus; and the prokaryotic cells (bacteria all go in this group) which did not have this 
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Unformatted text preview: separate nucleus. Although it did not happen immediately, it was realized that these cells were so different that a new kingdom was needed. 5. 1969---Whittakers Five-Kingdom system was founded. This system was based on the belief that procaryocytes were the ancestors of all other organisms. a. Kingdom Monera or Prokaryotae---all prokaryocytes, which means all bacteria b. Kingdom Protista---unicellular eukaryocytes---protozoa, unicellular algae, slime molds c. Kingdom Fungi---unicellular yeasts, multicellular (but still microscopic) molds, macroscopic mushrooms. Plantlike but no chlorophyll, so no photosynthesis. d. Kingdom Plantae---plants. All multicellular and all carry on photosynthesis. e. Kingdom Animalia---animals...
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