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THE TWO BRANCHES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

THE TWO BRANCHES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE - . ..Almost

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THE TWO BRANCHES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE   Successful study of immunology began in the late 1800’s. Emil van Behring received a Nobel  Prize in  1901 for proving that immunity to diphtheria could be transferred from an immune  animal to a susceptible animal by serum. This was called humoral immunity. Almost forty years  later it was discovered that the actual factors involved were antibodies. Cell-mediated immunity  (production of specialized lymphocytes) was discovered later. The two branches of the immune  response, humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, work together to give specific  protection against foreign cells and substances.  CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY   This involves specialized lymphocytes called T lymphocytes  (T cells) that act directly against  foreign organisms or tissues. T cells also regulate the activity of other parts of the immune  system. T cells work directly against:
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