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TYPES OF TRANSPLANTS AND THEIR CHANCES OF REJECTION

TYPES OF TRANSPLANTS AND THEIR CHANCES OF REJECTION - a To...

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TYPES OF TRANSPLANTS AND THEIR CHANCES OF REJECTION     1. Privileged sites and tissues---this type of transplant normally is not rejected and does not  require matching because it does not stimulate an immune response.       a. Cornea      b. Brain---one day we might be able to transplant nerves (but not yet)      c. Valves from pigs’ hearts      d. Pregnancy   2. Other transplants      a. Autograft---some of your own tissue, such as skin, is transplanted to another site on the  body      b. Isograft---between  identical twins      c. Allograft---between  two people who are not identical twins      d. Xenograft---between different species--disasters now but some day we may grow pigs with  human-like MHC proteins—transplanted tissue is called a xenotransplantation product.   3. Bone marrow transplants---this procedure is used in several circumstances:
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Unformatted text preview: a. To give a person who cannot produce B and T cells that ability b. Leukemia patients c. Metastasis of other cancers to the bone marrow The patient’s own bone marrow is destroyed and the transplant is given to replace it. Unfortunately, the new bone marrow sometimes produces immune cells that begin to attack the tissues of the recipient. This is called graft-versus-host disease. Use of umbilical cord blood, which is rich in stem cells, may work better than transplanting bone marrow. Persons who have received a transplant that might involve rejection must be treated to prevent that from happening. The major aim is to suppress cell-mediated immunity. The drugs used have side effects, so the benefits of the transplant must be weighed against the drawbacks....
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  • Fall '09
  • SMITH
  • Bone marrow, identical twins, new bone marrow, marrow transplants­­­this procedure, Isograft­­­between  identical twins

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