Emotion2 - Emotion The James-Lange Theory In the 1880s, two...

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Emotion The James-Lange Theory In the 1880s, two theorists, psychologist William James and physiologist Carl Lange , independently proposed an idea that challenged commonsense beliefs about emotion. This idea, which came to be known as the James-Lange theory , is that people experience emotion because they perceive their bodies’ physiological responses to external events. According to this theory, people don’t cry because they feel sad. Rather, people feel sad because they cry, and, likewise, they feel happy because they smile. This theory suggests that different physiological states correspond to different experiences of emotion. The Cannon-Bard Theory The physiologist Walter Cannon disagreed with the James-Lange theory, posing three main arguments against it: 1. People can experience physiological arousal without experiencing emotion, such as when they have been running. (The racing heart in this case is not an indication of fear.) 2. Physiological reactions happen too slowly to cause experiences of emotion, which occur
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Emotion2 - Emotion The James-Lange Theory In the 1880s, two...

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