oct27 midterm 1 for 1131

oct27 midterm 1 for 1131 - MATH 1131 MIDTERM - Wednesday,...

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MATH 1131 MIDTERM Wednesday, October 27; 50 minutes - ~ NAME: _____ S_O_L!_U_f_IO_N_CS ________ _ STUDENT NUMBER: ___ H+\ I~_e __ _ __\_(-'--H-O-P-~-~-I------·~ There are 5 questions on this test, worth a total of 50 points. The questions are in no particular order. Make sure that you show your work (when this is possible). When asked for comments in a ques- tion, do so succinctly, and you may use point form if you wish. We will be looking for a correct answer, not a lengthy answer. The last page contains the probability distributions for discrete RVs and you may detach it from the rest of the test. You may also use this page as scrap paper. You may write on the back of the pages if you run out of space. Good Luck!
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•• 1. (2 marks each) Determine whether each of the following statements is true or false (write T or F beside each statement). For these questions you do not need to show your work. (a) For a data set with a strongly right-skewed histogram, the sample mean will be smaller than the sample median. " (b) Suppose that we observe the outoome of three independent coin tosses. This is an example of a random variable. f ,- (c) The current median income in Toronto is 23,000 annually. Suppose that the top 5% of Toronto's population doubles its income, the bottom 5% of the population halves its income, and the income of the remaining population stays the same. Then the median income is still 23,000. (d) Two scatterplots for two different data sets are shown below. You know that the correlations coefficients for the two data sets are 0.823 and -0.518, but you can't remember which is which for sure. From looking at the plots, we can see that the correlation for the one on the right must be 0.823, and for the one on the left must be -0.518. C! '" "l .. "F ~ 0 .-' 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 "1 C! OJ C! •• -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 T (e) Consider two events, A and B. The probability of event A is 0.6 and the probability of event B is 0.7. It follows that the two events cannot be mutually exclusive.
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- - 2. A large cell phone company has three manufacturing plants: plants A, B, and C. They are concerned about the number of phones which are manufactured but are defective. Plants A and B are well-established with good standards of practice, and only 3% of the products they manufacture are defective. Plant C is relatively new, and 10% of its products are defective. Suppose that 20% of the company's cell phones are manufactured in plant A, 40% in plant B, and 40% in plant C.
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course MATH 1131 taught by Professor Wong during the Fall '10 term at York University.

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oct27 midterm 1 for 1131 - MATH 1131 MIDTERM - Wednesday,...

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