assigning oxidation numbers

assigning oxidation numbers - 1. Is the atom in an element...

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Assigning Oxidation Numbers The oxidation state of an atom when it's in a compound tell you how many more (or fewer) valence electrons the atom controls than when it's in the pure element. Atoms in positive oxidation states control fewer valence electrons, and atoms in negative states control more . One of the most important ways chemists use oxidation states is to know whether a chemical reaction is an oxidation-reduction reaction, or "redox" reaction. In a redox reaction the oxidation state of at least one atom must go up, and the oxidation state of at least one other atom must go down. Assign oxidation state to an atom in a compound by these steps:
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Unformatted text preview: 1. Is the atom in an element in its standard state. If so, the oxidation state is zero. E.g. H 2 , Ar. .. 1. Is the atom an atomic ion? If so, the oxidation state is simply usually equal to its charge. (Na is +1, Cl is -1, Fe is +3) 1. Is the atom part of a binary ionic compound? a. Binary ionic compounds are made up of atomic ions. 1. Is the atom in a molecule or polyatomic ion? The atoms of many elements have typical oxidation states when they're part of molecules: a. 1. Try to use the fact that atoms of certain main group elements strongly prefer one particular oxidation state when they are part of a molecule...
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assigning oxidation numbers - 1. Is the atom in an element...

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