project2 - 525 Computing Project 2, Spring 2012 * The...

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Unformatted text preview: 525 Computing Project 2, Spring 2012 * The Disputed Federalist Papers Linear and quadratic programming can be used to solve problems in many applications. In this project, we will apply quadratic programming to a machine learning formulation to determine the authorship of the disputed Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers were written in 1787-1788 by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison to persuade the citizens of the State of New York to ratify the U.S. Constitution. As was common in those days, these 77 shorts essays, about 900 to 3500 words in length, appeared in newspapers signed with a pseudonym, in this instance, Publius. In 1778 these papers were collected along with eight additional articles in the same subject and were published in book form. Since then, the consensus has been that John Jay was the sole author of five of a total 85 papers, that Hamilton was the sole author of 51, that Madison was the sole author of 14, and that Madison and Hamilton collaborated on another three. The authorship of the remaining 12 papers has been in dispute; these papers are usually referred to as the disputed papers. It has been generally agreed that the disputed papers were written by either Madison or Hamilton, but there was no consensus about which were written by Hamilton and which by Madison. The data, obtained from [ ? ], is available on the course website ( federalData.mat ). The file contains a data matrix with 118 lines of data, one line per pa- per. (A number of other papers with known authorship of either Hamilton or Madison were added to the Federalist Papers mentioned above, to provide extra data on the vocabularial habits of the two authors.) The first entry inextra data on the vocabularial habits of the two authors....
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This note was uploaded on 01/24/2012 for the course CS 525 taught by Professor Recth during the Fall '11 term at Wisconsin Milwaukee.

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project2 - 525 Computing Project 2, Spring 2012 * The...

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