mth155w12info - OAKLAND UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF...

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Unformatted text preview: OAKLAND UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS STUDENT INFORMATION SHEET AND SYLLABUS COURSE: MTH 155, Calculus II, 4 Credits SEMESTER: Winter 2012 Facult Office Section Class Time Room Phone Email Prof.B.Turett 4508EB 10515 10:40-11:47 am. MWF 172$EB 370-4023 [email protected] Prof.A.Spagnuolo 345 SEB 10270 noon—1:07 p.m. MWF 203 DHE 370-4032 [email protected] SUPPL EME/I/ TAL INSTRUCTION (availab/e to al/ sections): MWF 7:20 - 2:27pm MWF 203 DHE Prof. B. Cahion 550 SEB 10271 7:30-9:17p.m. T R 200 DHE 370-3435 [email protected] Attendance at every class is expected. N 0T E: Please also see your instructor's specific syllabus for your section of M TH155. OFFICE HOURS: To be announced. Please make use of your instructor’s office hours. You may also contact your instructor at his/her e-mail address. CATALOG DESCRIPTION FOR MTH 154-155: A comprehensive study of analytic geometry, limits, differentiation and integration of functions of one real variable, including transcendental functions, infinite series, indeterminate forms, polar coordinates, numerical methods and applications. Each is offered fall and winter semester. ADDITIONAL SUPPORT: You are encouraged to make use of supplemental instruction (SI). One section is offered; location and meeting times are given above. SI involves group activity designed to support the material and problem solving. You are encouraged to use the Academic Skills Center (103 NFH) for peer tutoring, study skills seminars, videotapes on mathematical topics, and more. PREREQUISITES: A 2.0 or better in MTI-l 154 or an equivalent course at another school. Prerequisites are strictly enforced: failure to satisfy the prerequisite or failure to provide in a timely manner documentation verifying satisfaction of the prerequisite will result in cancellation of your registration in the course. In order to do well in this course, you need to have skills in calculus of a single variable through definite integrals and their applications as well as a solid background in college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. A prerequisite test will be given on Monday, January 9 in the daytime sections. For the evening section, please see your specific syllabus. ' TEXT: Galen/us, S/ng/e Var/"able, Ear/y TranscendenIa/s, 7th Ed. (g Ca/cu/us, Ear/y Transcendenta/s, 7th Ed. for students who are planning to take MTI-l 254) by Stewart, published by Thomson. The material to be covered is contained in chapters 6-1 1. (See detailed syllabus below). You are expected to purchase a copy of this textbook. A student solutions manual, containing worked-out solutions to many of the exercises, is available at the bookcenter, but its purchase is totally optional (homework will be assigned from both those exercises that have answers in the back of the text and/or solutions in the manual and those that do not). In addition, a copy of the textbook, student solutions manual, alternative textbooks, and other material will be available on 2-hour reserve at Kresge Library. COURSE OBJECTIVES: Chapter 6: Applications of Integration; Chapter 7: Techniques of Integration; Chapter 8: Further Applications of Integration; Chapter 9: Differential Equations; Chapter 10: Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates; Chapter I 1: Infinite Sequences and Series. CALCULATOR POLICY: For this course, a graphing calculator is strongly recommended. No matter what kind of calculator you have, it is important to learn to use it effectively. In particular, know how to do long calculations without writing down intermediate answers, and be aware of how many digits of accuracy you can expect an answer to have. To receive full credit on exams, be sure to show all the mathematical work necessary for setting up a calculation before using the calculator. Try to use your calculator imaginatively, too; for example, calculators often provide you with ways to verify an answer (e.g. by graphing with a graphing calculator, or plugging in particular values of variables). Using a calculator to store formulas you need for an exam is not permitted. EXAMS: In the daytime sections, there will be 3 one-hour exams (worth 100 points each) scheduled for Friday, February 3, Friday, M arch 9, and Wednesday, A p ril 4. The hour exams and the final exam are closed-book exams. In the evening section, there will be 2 in-class exams. Please see the corresponding handout for the dates of these exams. HOMEWORK AND QUIZZES: Please see your instructor's specific syllabus for information on homework and quizzes. FINAL EXAM: The final examination is comprehensive. It will be given on Friday, April 20 at 8:00am—10:45 am in a room to be announced. The final exam is worth 200 points. For the evening section, see the corresponding handout for information on the final exam. EMERGENCY CLOSING: If the University is closed at the time of a scheduled in-class exam or quiz, (for example, because of snow), it will be given during the next class period when the University reopens. The Oakland University emergency closing number is 248-370-2000. GRADING POLICY: Your course grade will be based upon a weighted percentage taken from your homework, hour exams, and final exam. There is no fixed grading scale for this course; a conversion formula from your percentage score to Oakland University grades will be determined with each exam and announced upon return of the exam. The following list shows the lowest possible grade that a given percentage score will earn (the grade may be higher than this): 9§%->4.0, 80%—>3.0, 65%—>2.0, 50%—>l .0. MAKE-UP POLICY: No make-up exams or make-up quizzes will be given. If you miss an exam and have a valid documented excuse, your final exam will be used to calculate the score of the excused exam; otherwise the missed exam will count as a 0. ACADEMIC HONESTY: Cheating is a serious academic offense. Oakland University policy requires that all suspected instances of cheating be reported to the Academic Conduct Committee for adjudication. Anyone found guilty of cheating in this course will receive a course grade of 0.0, in addition to any penalty assigned by the Academic Conduct Committee. Working with others on a homework assignment does not constitute cheating; handing in an assignment that has essentially been copied from someone else does. Receiving help from someone else or from unauthorized written material during a quiz, exam, or final exam is cheating, as is using a calculator as an electronic "crib sheet." Providing such assistance for someone else also constitutes cheating. STUDY HABITS: Cultivating good work and study habits is necessary for doing well in mathematical sciences courses. You should keep on top of the subject by doing large amounts of homework (frequently working on problems not assigned), regularly reviewing earlier material, asking questions in class, and making good use of your instructor's office hours and the Academic Skills Center. If you are having difficulty with some concept or mathematical procedure, you should get it clarified as soon as possible. If you make mistakes on exams or quizzes, rework these problems with the idea that you will not make similar mistakes later. Regular reviewing of older material in the course will put you in good stead when it comes to final exam time. This will help you to avoid the usual non- retention problems that students encounter at the end of the course. You should expect that doing all of these things will take at least two hours outside of class for each hour in class. Many students find it helpful to spend some of this time working with others, in study groups. DROPPING THE COURSE: The Department of Mathematics and Statistics is committed to achieving the goal of an academically sound freshman and sophomore mathematical sciences curriculum in which most conscientious Oakland University students can expect to be successful. If you are considering dropping the course and wish to discuss the matter further, you are encouraged to contact your instructor. ONLINE TUTORING: Onlinc math tutoring is available through moodlooaklandcdu TENTATIVE (INTENDED)SYLLABUS WINTER 2012 WEE-133d” _ _‘ ; " riday Jan. 4 * ' . Jan 5 irst Day of Class Review of i ‘ ' i .5 Ave. Value ofa Function, 1 ‘ . isome concepts in Cale I 6.1 Areas Between Curve Jan. 11 an. Jan. 13 .2 Volumes 6. 3 Volumes by Cylindrical Shells "WWW” "WW” Jarif 20 7 1 Integration by Parts f . 16 K Jr. Holiday, No Classes 7. 2 Trig. Integrals ‘ l ‘ 7.3 Trig. Substitution cont, f 7.4 Partial Fractions an. 30 :7. 4 Partial Fractions, (7. 5) 'Feb. 6 7. 7 A pprox. Integrationwmm Feb 13 82 Area of Surface of evolution 81m Feb. 15 WMF ‘ . 1 WFeb. 17 8. 3 Applications to Physics and 8 3 Applications to Physics and EngineeringWWWW Engineering cont. Feb . f . Fe 22 Winter Reeees Ne Class ; g. ‘ Winter Recess. No Class Feb. 29 10.3 Polar Coordinates EFeb. 27 10.1 Curves Def. by Par. Eqns.,‘ 10.2 Cale. with Parametric urves M arch 5 ‘ 10. 4 Areas and Lengths 1n olar Coorcls cont.” March 12 .1 l .1 Sequences 10.4 Areas and Lengths in ‘ olar Coords WM arch 16 11.3 The Integral Test and Estimates of Sums MaTEhHe _ . . - March23 “ ”m" 11.4 The Comparison Tests ’ "~ ~ . ‘ ’ ' ‘ ’ 1 11 6 Abs. Convergence and the .. p .1 _ . atio& Root Tests . . VMarch26 - , L i 5 _' MarChBO 1 1 1. 8 Power Series ‘ . . ' ‘ ‘ 11.9 Reps. of Functions as 1 _ ' . ower Series cont. 1 A ril 2 A 111 . ~ ‘ ' """"""" 1 VI , ' ' l 1.10 Taylor and Maclaurin . ‘ .. . , .. . _ Series ' A 111' 1 4' ' ' ‘ A 11113" "WWW )1 1.1 1 Applications ofTaylor .1 Modeling with DES, eview Catch up {Polynomials . _ , .3 Separable DES ’ \ . ' , WIAQHI 18"'”””"”" I" ‘ . “ ~‘ » 1 A ril 16 Last day of class, eview, Catch Up 1 , ...
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