Glycolysi1 - Glycolysis Anaerobic Respiration: Homolactic...

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Glycolysis Anaerobic Respiration: Homolactic Fermentation After Glycolysis Glycolysis, as we have just described it, is an anaerobic process. None of its nine steps involve the use of oxygen. However, immediately upon finishing glycolysis, the cell must continue respiration in either an aerobic or anaerobic direction; this choice is made based on the circumstances of the particular cell. A cell that can perform aerobic respiration and which finds itself in the presence of oxygen will continue on to the aerobic citric acid cycle in the mitochondria. If a cell able to perform aerobic respiration is in a situation where there is no oxygen (such as muscles under extreme exertion), it will move into a type of anaerobic respiration called homolactic fermentation. Some cells such as yeast are unable to carry out aerobic respiration and will automatically move into a type of anaerobic respiration called alcoholic fermentation. Figure %: Anaerobic vs. Aerobic pathways
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This note was uploaded on 01/24/2012 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Glycolysi1 - Glycolysis Anaerobic Respiration: Homolactic...

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