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DH chapter 6 - Darling-Hammond Chapter 6 Valerie Taylor...

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Darling-Hammond Chapter 6 Valerie Taylor Brandon Ward Jennifer Arndt
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Finland – “thinking curriculum” Finnish Core Principles 1) Resources for those who need them most – 98% of all educational costs are covered by the government. 2) High standards and supports for special needs This is completed in many ways, including having qualified teachers and schools that generally have less then 300 students. 3) Qualified Teachers – Teachers participate in a 3-year graduate program that is paid for by the government. Due to this spots are highly coveted and about 15% of students that apply to be teachers are accepted. Most teachers have duel masters, one in their content area and one in education. 4) Evaluation of education – There are no external standardized tests; instead, teachers give narrative feedback that emphasizes where students excel and where they need more work. 5) Balancing decentralization and centralization – By investing in qualified teachers, Finland can allow teachers to develop their own curriculum, which gives schools more autonomy and helps eliminates external testing.
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DH chapter 6 - Darling-Hammond Chapter 6 Valerie Taylor...

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