Extra+elegans+questions

Extra+elegans+questions - The target gene itself remains...

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EXTRA STUDY QUESTIONS for C. elegans 1. Why is RNAi considered a “knockdown”, that is a partial loss of function, rather than a complete “knockout”? 2.Once a male is present in the population, why should the number of males in the population increase in subsequent generations? Explain by discussing the gametes and progeny that are produced.
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Answers: 1. Why is RNAi considered a “knockdown”, that is a partial loss of function, rather than a complete “knockout”? RNAi reduces the amount of RNA and hence protein of the target gene ; however, usually, there are still some RNA and protein molecules remaining, so the phenotype does not always represent a complete loss of function of the target gene
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Unformatted text preview: . The target gene itself remains unaltered, which is why this is called a phenocopy rather than a mutation. 2.Once a male is present in the population, why should the number of males in the population increase in subsequent generations? Explain by discussing the gametes and progeny that are produced. When there are males on the plate, they will mate with the hermaphrodites. When this happens 50% of the progeny from such a mating between a male and a hermaphrodite will be male . Female gametes: X and X; male gametes: X and O; therefore, 50% XX and 50% XO embryos....
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This note was uploaded on 01/25/2012 for the course MCB 160L160L taught by Professor Venkatesansundaresan during the Fall '11 term at UC Davis.

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Extra+elegans+questions - The target gene itself remains...

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