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lecture 5 - VEN 3 Lecture 5 Previous Lecture The previous...

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VEN 3 Lecture 5 Previous Lecture: The previous lecture was about wine microorganisms and the differences between good yeast strains and bad yeast strains. The professor also discussed fermentation. Making Table Wines Part I I. Harvest A. Grapes sampled as they near maturity to measure the sugar and acid levels 1. Sugar measured by the refraction of light (refractometer) or density of juice (hydrometer) 2. Acid measured by titration and measurement of pH B. The decision to harvest is based on the style of wine to be made and the desired alcohol concentration 1. Grapes above 25.5 Brix produce over 14% alcohol 2. Grapes less than 16 Brix produce less than 9% alcohol 3. Most wines 11-13% 4. Brix scale not used widely outside the US C. Sparkling wine are harvested at 18-20 Brix, because the alcohol concentration is further elevated later II. Crushing and SO2 Addition A. Grapes are crushed to make the yeast accessible to the yeast B. A machine called the crusher-destemmer is used 1. Separates the berries from the stem and breaks open the berries
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