lecture_6 - S t a r F o r m a t i o n Dense cores of...

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Unformatted text preview: S t a r F o r m a t i o n Dense cores of molecular clouds collapse into hot plasma which eventually triggers nuclear reactions. Release of gravitational energy both heats the material and produces infrared radiation. Conservation of angular momentum requires spin rate to increase during collapse and disc formation. Emissions of protostar hidden by cooler infalling matter; eventually breaks out at poles (least resistance), producing jets. Dense clumps form in protostellar disc that eventually themselves collapse into planets. Sufficiently rapidly rotating collapses form double or multiple stars. Young stars emissions sweep out gas and dust from planetary system. csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/solarsys/nebular.html C. R. ODell and S. K. Wong (Rice U.), WFPC2, HST, NASA B. Reipurth (Univ. of Col.), NASA Lattimer, AST 248, Lecture 6 p.1/14 S t a r F o r m i n g R e g i o n s H. Yang (UIUC) & J. Hester (ASU), NASA C.R. ODell (Rice U.), NASA NGC604 M42 M8 Lattimer,AST248,Lecture6p.2/14 S o l a r S y s t e m F o r m a t i o n History Georges Buffon suggested in 1745 that the planets formed when a massive object (a comet, he thought) collided with the Sun and splashed out debris that coalesced into planets....
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This note was uploaded on 01/25/2012 for the course AST 248 taught by Professor Walter during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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lecture_6 - S t a r F o r m a t i o n Dense cores of...

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