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Lab 5 - Lindle 1 J Michael Lindle Mr O AP Bio 30 Nov 2009...

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Lindle 1 J. Michael Lindle Mr. O AP Bio 30 Nov. 2009 Cell Respiration Temperature effects the rate of cellular respiration. Materials: 3 fish tanks, 3 bony fish (must be the same type of fish with similar dimen- sions), 1 stop watch, 3 people counting. * (choose your animal) The two fish that you choose must be of the same kind and must fit under the category of Osteichthyes (bony fish). Trout, salmon, ocean sun- fish, oarfish, eels, Atlantic blue marlon, giant grouper, and the dwarf pygmy goby should work fine. I chose the Rainbow Trout. Background Information: It is a fact that the lower the water temperature is, the higher amount of dissolved oxygen is in the body of water. As expected, the warmer the body of water is, the less dissolved oxygen is in it. Hypothesis (results expected): Every time a bony fish needs to breathe, the Operculum opens (bony flap over gills) and gas exchange occurs. In cold water (10°C), the Rain- bow Trout is likely to open it’s Operculum less often because each time it takes in more oxygen since there is a higher concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water. In warm- er water (22°C) the Rainbow Trout is likely to open it’s Operculum more often because each time it takes in less oxygen since there is a lower concentration of dissolved oxy- gen in the water. The fish in the 15°C water should have an Operculum flapping rate that fits in between the other two fish; we’ll call that average. Procedure (design an experiment): 1. Fill the first tank with water that is 10°C, fill the second tank with water that is 15°C, and fill the third tank with water that is 22°C. Make sure to put the same amount of water in each tank. 2. Add the Rainbow Trout to the tanks and allow them to settle in for a couple of minutes as you gather your two partners and your stop watch. 3. Next you will start the stop watch and immediately after count how many times the Operculum opens. You will record your data every 30 seconds for 4 minutes; always counting from where you left off. For example, after 30 seconds you counted 25, at 31 seconds after the flap opens again, you will continue to say 26, 27, etc… 4. Record your data, fire up the grill, and dig in. Quantify Results Derived Unit: Say for example one of the Rainbow Trout takes 330 flaps of breath every 5 minutes. That reduces down to 11 flaps of breath every 10 seconds. The rate of respiration in this Trout’s case is 1.1 flaps/1 second.
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Lindle 2 Table 5.1: Pea Volume=8 mL Table 5.1 Measurement of O 2 Consumption by Soaked and Dry Pea Seeds at Room Temperature (25 °C ) and 10 °C Using Volumetric Methods Te mp ( ° C) Time (Min) Beads Alone Germinating Peas Dry Peas and Beads Reading at time X Diff.
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