Jardin d'Eden (1).pdf - After centuries of masters teaching...

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Unformatted text preview: After centuries of masters teaching apprentices the skills needed to draw humans with godlike proportions and anatomically correct, perfect figures there was a much needed change. Instead of copying reality to canvas artists painted colors, light, and motion in the elements. You can argue that all artists have been doing that, but the Impressionists were the ones that revolutionized art for the future.While the critics of their time saw the imperfections or lack of detail, they glanced over the capturing of the natural world in it’s true essence. New techniques, revolutionary changes, and a modernizing of the art culture were slowly being introduced to France and soon the world through the beauty of nature (Samu 2004). To find inspiration for their paintings, Impressionists took the romantic route and went into nature. Exploring en plein air (outside) let them capture the nature of light by painting their impression of how it looked in a certain moment in time (The Art Story 2020). They would capture light with individual strokes rather than the traditional method of blending. The impressionists would also focus on the nature of color and its complement. Impressionists found that the natural color of shadows is the complementary color of the source of light (Tate). For example, in Claude Monet’s Bridge over a Pond of Water Lilies the upper, main part of the bridge is slightly blue in color while the underneath is a dark violet and not black. Impressionist techniques were unlike anyone had seen before in the Salons of the Louvre. Visual strokes, undefined borders, and big splotches of paint all over the canvas. These were not the recycled perfectionist methods that art masters had been passing down for centuries, this was unseen before. Manet focused color in strokes while Monet focused on the light. Nicholas Dodemaide Name: Bridge Over a Pond of Water Lilies Artist: Claude Monet Material: Oil, canvas Relative/Absolute Date: 1899 Culture: French Scale: 36 1/2 x 29 in. (92.7 x 73.7 cm) Current Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art URL: search/437127 Claude Monet wanted something in his backyard to paint and appreciate so he had a pond with water lilies put in along with a bridge at his house in Giverny. He ended up painting eighteen different views of this same bridge in 1899 (The Met). When Monet was learning to paint his mentor taught en plein air so while he first moved to Paris he would paint from windows. Monet was highly influenced by his impressionist friends like Manet and his love for capturing nature in the moment ( ). As war broke out through France he moved to England where he still continued his passion of going out and painting. He eventually ended back up in Paris after some more travelling and painting and his painting Impression, Sunrise was hung in the first Impressionist exhibition where the name and their style gave rise to the name of this new category of painting ( ). Name: The Garden at Bellevue Artist: Edouard Manet Material: Oil, canvas Relative/Absolute Date: 1880 Culture: French Scale: 65 x 54 cm Current Location: Private Location URL: net/the-garden-at-bellevue-1880 Manet swiftly gained popularity in the art community in the Paris Salons just as quick as his paintings were seen as derogatory. His unique style for painting and even drawing still lifes were seen as imperfect and incomplete. He painted people as he saw them without portraying them as gods and more so exposed the typical trends of the time. He had entered still lifes of men with prostitutes into the gallery where he received harsh criticism (Rabinow 2004). Despite the backlash Manet continued to paint still lifes. Color was Manet’s passion. Influenced by Monet, Degas, and Renoir, he had finally felt like he belonged after being rejected for decades prior (Rabinow 2004). Manet went to Bellevue for his health where he painted this portrait. Just like all of his colleagues he painted en plein air. Name: Forest Artist: Paul Cezanne Material: Oil, canvas Relative/Absolute Date: c.1890 Culture: French Scale: 72 x 92 cm Current Location: White House, Washington, DC, US URL: rest Unlike Manet and Monet, Cezanne had a foundation built for him to join in but this does not mean it was easy for him. Cezanne’s techniques were unique compared to his influencers at first. Cezanne would use thick dollops of paint and apply it to the canvas with a palette knife instead of a brush. At first his style was not exactly impressionist until after he had entered the Impressionist first exhibit. He then started using brighter paints and painting en plein air as the artists recommended (Voorhies 2004). Later he had developed a use for light and more refined paint strokes. Cezanne’s individuality mixed with his influence paved the way from post-impressionist and modern art. ...
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