Lecture 2 - Earthquakes - Earth Processes EAS 2600 Lecture...

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Earth Processes EAS 2600 Lecture 2 Earthquakes
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EAS 2600 Earth Processes Class Materials: http://t-square.gatech.edu
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Global Earthquake Model (GEM) follows Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Project In 50 years, there is a 10% chance of exceeding the indicated ground acceleration (in g) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.5 g 0.4 M=8 China M=9 Sumatra
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Earthquakes (Chapter 13) Earthquakes (Chapter 13) Earthquakes can be understood in terms Earthquakes can be understood in terms of the basic mechanisms of deformation. of the basic mechanisms of deformation. Most earthquakes occur at plate Most earthquakes occur at plate boundaries (convergent, divergent, and boundaries (convergent, divergent, and transform). transform). Earthquakes cannot yet be reliably Earthquakes cannot yet be reliably predicted or mitigated. predicted or mitigated.
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Lecture Outline Lecture Outline 1. 1. What is an earthquake? What is an earthquake? 2. How do we study earthquakes? 2. How do we study earthquakes? 3. Earthquakes and patterns of faulting 3. Earthquakes and patterns of faulting 4. Earthquake hazards and risks 4. Earthquake hazards and risks 5. Can earthquakes be predicted? 5. Can earthquakes be predicted?
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1. What Is an Earthquake? 1. What Is an Earthquake? Global forces at work Global forces at work stress stress strain strain strength strength
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1. What Is an Earthquake? 1. What Is an Earthquake? Earthquakes Earthquakes occur where rocks occur where rocks being stressed suddenly break being stressed suddenly break along a new or pre-existing along a new or pre-existing fault. fault. Seismic waves Seismic waves are ground are ground vibrations caused by rocks vibrations caused by rocks slipping along opposite sides of a slipping along opposite sides of a fault. fault.
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1. What Is an Earthquake? 1. What Is an Earthquake? Why earthquakes occur Why earthquakes occur elastic rebound theory elastic rebound theory fault rupture fault rupture epicenter epicenter focus focus
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1. What Is an Earthquake?
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course EAS 2600 taught by Professor Ingalls during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lecture 2 - Earthquakes - Earth Processes EAS 2600 Lecture...

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