Lecture 3 - Earthquakes - Lecture 3 Earthquakes A...

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Lecture 3 Earthquakes
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A time-travel graph is used to find the distance to the epicenter Figure 8.10
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5 01/26/12 zpeng GT seminar Magnitude 8.8 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE Magnitude 8.8 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE Saturday, February 27, 2010 at 06:34:17 UTC Saturday, February 27, 2010 at 06:34:17 UTC Global record section The global surface wave displacements around the globe are shown. The closest shown station is in Argentina and the most distant one is in Mongolia. A 6.9 aftershock is visible for comparative scale near 90 minutes after the mainshock.
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Earthquake Magnitude Local Magnitude (M L ) Often measured using the Richter scale Based on the amplitude of the largest seismic wave Each unit of Richter magnitude equates to roughly a 32-fold energy increase Does not estimate adequately the size of very large earthquakes
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Most Seismic Energy is Released in Large Earthquakes !
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What factors control the stability of structures during an Earthquake?
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Rock Type and Shaking Intensity the amplitude of shaking is greatest on unconsolidated sediment and artificial fill Busch, ed., 2003
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Earthquake Destruction Destruction results from Ground shaking Liquefaction of the ground Saturated material turns fluid Underground objects may float to surface Tsunami, or seismic sea waves Landslides and ground subsidence Fires
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low income housing = unreinforced masonry Earthquakes Do Not Kill People, Bad Buildings Do!
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Earthquake Engineering base isolation reduces the earthquake-generated forces acting on buildings
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Destruction from Earthquakes road collapse building collapse fire
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course EAS 2600 taught by Professor Ingalls during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lecture 3 - Earthquakes - Lecture 3 Earthquakes A...

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