Chapter04a - Atmospheric Moisture Recap: daily temperature...

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Atmospheric Moisture
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During the day, the Earth’s surface and air above will continue to warm as long as incoming  energy (mainly sunlight) exceeds outgoing energy from the surface. At night, the Earth’s surface cools, mainly by giving up more infrared radiation than it  receives – a process called  radiational cooling. The  coldest nights of winter occur when the air is calm, fairly dry (low water-vapor content),  and cloud free.  The highest temperatures during the day and the lowest temperatures at night are normally  observed at the Earth’s surface. Therefore, the greatest daily variation in air temperature also  occurs at the surface.  Radiation inversions  exist usually at night when the air near the ground is colder than the air  above. Both the diurnal and annual ranges of temperatures are greater in dry climates than in humid  ones. Even though two cities may have similar average annual temperatures, the range and extreme  of their temperatures can differ greatly. How cold the wind makes us feel is usually expressed as a 
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Chapter04a - Atmospheric Moisture Recap: daily temperature...

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