Chapter13a - Weather Forecasting - I Review of Chapter 12

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Weather Forecasting - I
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Review of Chapter 12 The  polar front model  (Norwegian model) of a developing mid-latitude cyclonic storm  represents a simplified but useful model of how an ideal storm progresses through the stages  of birth, maturity and dissipation. Cyclogenesis, lee-side lows, northeasters, bombs. For a surface mid-latitude  cyclonic storm  to form, there must be an area of  upper-level  divergence above the surface low . For the surface storm to intensify, this region of upper  level divergence must be greater than surface convergence.
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Another way of looking at it.
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Review of Chapter 12 When the  polar-front jet stream  develops into a looping wave, it provides  an area of upper-level divergence for the development of surface mid- latitude cyclonic storms.
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Review of Chapter 12 The curving nature of the polar-front jet stream tends to direct surface mid-latitude  cyclonic storms northeastward  and surface  anticyclones southeastward . Skip the sections: Conveyor belt model of mid-latitude cyclones. A developing mid-latitude  cyclone: the March storm of 1993. Vorticity, divergence, and developing mid-latitude  cyclones. Earth vorticity, relative vorticity and absolute vorticity. Putting it all together: a  monstrous snowstorm. Polar lows.
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Importance of forecasting: air-travel
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Importance of forecasting
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Importance of forecasting
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Acquisition of Weather Information Surface measurements  (surface weather stations) Land (more than 10,000 stations) Ocean (ships, buoys, drifting automatic stations) Upper air data :  radiosondes, aircraft, satellites  
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Collection and Exchange of Weather Information The  World Meteorological Organization  (WMO) – UN agency, 175 nations,  standardization and exchange of data.   World Meteorological Centers : Melbourne, Moscow, Washington D.C.
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Chapter13a - Weather Forecasting - I Review of Chapter 12

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