Alcohol Abuse-Jada B.docx - ALCOHOL ABUSE EPIDEMIOLOGYICAL ANALYSIS Jada Butler Epidemiological Analysis Performed on Alcohol Abuse Chamberlain College

Alcohol Abuse-Jada B.docx - ALCOHOL ABUSE EPIDEMIOLOGYICAL...

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ALCOHOL ABUSE: EPIDEMIOLOGYICAL ANALYSIS Page 1 Jada Butler Epidemiological Analysis Performed on Alcohol Abuse Chamberlain College of Nursing NR503NP-12743: Population Health, Epidemiology, & Statistical Principles June 14th, 2020
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ALCOHOL ABUSE: EPIDEMIOLOGYICAL ANALYSIS Page 2 Alcohol addiction or Alcohol use disorder as some may call it is characterized by excessive alcohol consumption and is “recognized as a major public health issue” (Crome, & Crome, 2018). Alcoholism is the third leading lifestyle-related cause of death, after tobacco use and unhealthy dieting (CDC, 2018). The annual cost of alcohol in the United States reached $249 billion in 2015 and 77% of drinking beverages were due to binge drinking (CDC, 2018). There is an average of 6 deaths per day in the United states and 24.6 % of people 18 years or over, admit to excessive alcohol consumption resulting in negative outcomes at some point in their life (NIAAA, 2020). The list of health risks due to excessive alcohol consumption can be summed up into short-term health risks long-term health risks. The short-term health risks include injuries (such as motor vehicle crashes, etc), violence (such as homicide, suicide, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence), alcohol poisoning, risky sexual behaviors, and lastly miscarriages, stillbirths or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders among pregnant women (CDC, 2019). The long- term health risks include “high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and digestive problems, variety of cancers, weakening of the immune system”, learning and memory problems, variety of mental health problems, social problems (lost productivity, family problems, and unemployment), and alcohol dependence (CDC, 2020). As listed, numerous health risks are leading to potentially dangerous conditions. Thus, the need of analyzing alcohol addiction, a plan to decrease alcohol addiction, and how this plan is implemented into a Nurse Practitioner role is crucial to provide quality care and improve patients’ outcomes. Background and Significance As mentioned earlier, alcohol is characterized as excessive alcohol consumption and is recognized as a major public health issue and can be further described with signs and symptoms of the disorder. (Crome, & Crome, 2018). The standard drink is 12 oz. of beer, 8 oz. of malt
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ALCOHOL ABUSE: EPIDEMIOLOGYICAL ANALYSIS Page 3 liquor, 5 oz. of wine, or 1.5 of 80 proof distilled spirits, and this in moderation is 1 drink per day for men and 2 drinks per day for men (CDC, 2020). Alcohol addiction is based on heavy or excessive drinking is defined for women as “8 or more drinks per week and men 15 or more drinks per week” (CDC, 2020). Signs and symptoms of alcohol addiction include neglecting your responsibilities because of alcohol consumption, using alcohol in situations where it is physically dangerous (those who go against doctor’s order or mix with prescription medicine), experiencing repeated legal problems in relationships, and using alcohol to relax or de-stress (NIAAA, 2020). In the Table below, it will include vital statistics comparing the United States
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