I_Energy_S10_Student

I_Energy_S10_Student - Iodine/Iodide Chapter 13 pp 438-439...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Iodine/Iodide Chapter 13 pp. 438-439
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part of thyroid hormones which regulate: Body temperature metabolic rate Reproduction growth Blood cell production Nerve & muscle function
Background image of page 2
Iodine deficiency Thyroid hormone production declines Cells of thyroid gland enlarge to trap as much iodide as possible goiter
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Goiter About 200 million people affected Many in South America, Asia, and Africa 96% caused by iodide deficiency 4% caused by excessive goitrogen consumption **cabbage**, spinach, radishes, rutabagas Soybeans, peanuts Strawberries, peaches
Background image of page 4
Iodide deficiency Even mild deficiency results in impaired school performance (reversible) Deficiency during pregnancy results in cretinism (irreversible) Physical and mental retardation
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Iodide toxicity Enlarged thyroid gland (similar to deficiency) Toxicity during pregnancy can cause huge goiter in infant obstructs airway UL = 1,100 mcg/day (>7 x RDA)
Background image of page 6
Iodide Intake RDA = 150 mcg/day ocean is major source Seafood, water, even sea mist Inland, iodide intake varies depending on content in soil Landmasses previously under ocean are rich in iodide Iodide leached out of soil in flood zone
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Iodide intake in the US Exceeds RDA, but below UL fast foods contribute large amount due to iodized salt Some from bakery products and milk
Background image of page 8
Energy production B-vitamins and zinc
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Thiamin (vitamin B1) Part of thiamin pyrophospate (TPP) In conversion from pyruvate to acetyl-CoA In TCA cycle Part of membranes of nerve cells
Background image of page 10
Thiamin intake recommendations Generally thiamin needs met if adequate energy intake (from nutritious foods) RDA: Men: 1.2 mg/day Women: 1.1 mg/day
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Thiamin deficiency Malnourished Homeless Individuals consuming large amounts of empty calories (ex: alcohol) Alcohol interferes with thiamin absorption AND increases urinary excretion 80% of alcoholics are thiamin deficient
Background image of page 12
Beriberi
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 61

I_Energy_S10_Student - Iodine/Iodide Chapter 13 pp 438-439...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online