Metabolism_S10_Student

Metabolism_S10_Student - *Metabolism * read a few times...

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1 *Metabolism * read a few times times Chapter 7
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What is metabolism? All the chemical reactions that occur in our bodies Energy metabolism includes reactions by which we _obtain energy from food_ _expend energy_
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Site of metabolic reactions Inside all cells _liver_ cells most metabolically active and most versatile
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Metabolic work of liver Conversion of fructose & galactose to glucose Glycogenesis Glycogenolysis Gluconeogenesis Fatty acid production Fat breakdown for energy Lipoprotein packaging Bile synthesis Ketone body production Synthesis of nonessential AA’s Deamination of AA’s Removal of ammonia from blood Plasma protein synthesis Detoxification of alcohol, drugs, poisons
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Anabolic reactions Reactions in which _small molecules are combined to build large molecules_ Require energy
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Catabolic reactions Compounds broken down Release energy
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Anabolic or Catabolic? 1. Glucose + glucose glycogen-- anabolic 2. Triglyceride glycerol + 3 fatty acids-- catabolic 3. Gluconeogenesis-- anabolic 4. Glycogenesis-- anabolic 5. Beta oxidation of fatty acids --- catabolic 6. Fatty acids body fat--- anabolic 7. Fatty acids energy--- catabolic
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Energy transfer Energy storage compounds store energy released during _breakdown_ of glucose, glycerol, FA’s and AA’s Release _energy_ when required Example: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)
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Coupled reactions
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Basic units derived from foods glucose glycerol fatty acids amino acids Broken down further into C, H, O, N
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Metabolic pathways Different fuels use different pathways Not all can provide _glucose_ _glucose_ needed by CNS and RBC’s Eventually, all enter _ICA cycle_and electron transport chain
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12 Energy-yielding pathways
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GLUCOSE METABOLISM
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Glycolysis-- converted to 2 pyruvate molecules
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Glycolysis essentials _Anaerobic_ Glucose two 3-carbon fragments 3-carbon fragments converted to _pyruvate_ Net yield: 2 pyruvate molecules for each glucose molecule Only small energy yield
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course NTDT 200 taught by Professor Aljadir during the Fall '08 term at University of Delaware.

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Metabolism_S10_Student - *Metabolism * read a few times...

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