Social Policy

Social Policy - Social Policy: "public policy and...

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Social Policy: "public policy and practice in the areas of health care, human services, criminal justice, inequality, education, and labor." (The Malcilm Wiener Center for Social Policy at Harvard University) Social Security refers to the federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. The original Social Security Act (1935) and the current version of the Act, as amended encompass several social welfare and social insurance programs. What are the underlying influences and ideologies that shape the policy? Social welfare in America is influenced by two factors: who benefits and who pays, as well as the beliefs citizens have about social justice. Social security is an example of majoritarian politics. Since the benefits and costs of the program are widely distributed, the proposal is adopted if the beneficiaries believe that their benefits will exceed their costs and if political elites believe that it is legitimate for the government to adopt such a program.
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Social Policy - Social Policy: "public policy and...

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