Lect4Div2&5MechWorkSP2012

Lect4Div2&5MechWorkSP2012 - ME 200: Thermodynamics...

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ME 200: Thermodynamics I Lecture 4: Mechanical Concepts of Energy and Work
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This Lecture Work and Kinetic Energy Potential Energy » Gravitational potential energy Conservation of Energy in Mechanics Sign Convention and Notation in Thermodynamics » W > 0 : work done by the system » W < 0 : work done on the system » Sign convention is the opposite of that in mechanics
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Work and Kinetic Energy In mechanics, work is defined as the integral of the dot product of the force and displacement of a body  22 11 21 1 2: 1 2 s s sV s dV dV ds Fm m dt ds dt dV mV ds Fd s mVdV Integrating from state to state we obtain s mVdV V KE     2 1 WF d s s 1 s 2
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Potential Energy Consider a body moving vertically from z 1 to z 2 in the gravitational field of the earth  22 11 2 1 2 1 2 1 21 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 , 1 2 zz z z z z s s Rdz mgdz m V V mg dz mg z z mV V mg z z Rd z or more generally V s    
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Kinetic and Potential Energy Example Problem Moran and Shapiro P2.15: A block of mass m
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2012 for the course ME 200 taught by Professor Gal during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Lect4Div2&amp;amp;5MechWorkSP2012 - ME 200: Thermodynamics...

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