Soul Beliefs Final Notes Pt. 2

Soul Beliefs Final Notes Pt. 2 - Notes on Contemporary...

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Notes on Contemporary Battles Between Spokespersons for Religion and Spokespersons for the theory of Evolution The Scopes Trial –an American legal case in 1925 in which high school biology teacher John Scopes was accused of violating the state’s Butler Act which made it unlawful to teach evolution. (Course Reader / 178) The trial drew intense national publicity, as national reporters flocked to the small town of Dayton, to cover the big-name lawyers representing each side. William Jennings Bryan – argued for prosecution, hadn’t tried a case in 36 years Clarence Darrow – famed defense attorney, agnostic The American Civil Liberties Union offered to defend anyone accused of teaching the theory of evolution in defiance of the Butler Act. Teachers were required to teach from textbooks, which naturally taught evolution. The law was essentially designed to benefit a particular religious group, which would be unconstitutional. (181) Verdict came out as guilty. “Your honor, I feel that I have been convicted of violating an unjust statute. I will continue in the future, as I have in the past, to oppose this law in any way I can. Any other action would be in violation of my ideal of academic freedom – that is, to teach the truth as guaranteed in our constitution, of personal ad religious freedom.” (World’s Most
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This note was uploaded on 01/25/2012 for the course 830 123 taught by Professor Hamilton,ogilvie during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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Soul Beliefs Final Notes Pt. 2 - Notes on Contemporary...

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